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First-Year Seminar Descriptions for Winter Term 2015

First-Year Seminars offer every Dartmouth first-year student an opportunity to participate in a course structured around independent research, small group discussion, and intensive writing. Below you will find a list of the courses being offered next term.

Anthropology

ANTH-07.05-01

Hour: 9L Instructor: Laura Ogden

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Animals & Humans: A Beastly Experiment in Ethics, Theory & Writing

Companion animals are commonly treated as “members of the family,” and we have become increasingly concerned about the welfare of other animals, such as those used in experimental lab settings. Still, these concerns are predicated on contradictory philosophies of human/non-human difference. In this course we consider the diverse ways animals are a part of our lives – for instance, as symbols, commodities, and workers. In the process, we begin to formulate new approaches to multispecies ethics and reconsider what we mean by “human.”

Our goal in this course is collective. We are going to produce a contemporary version of the medieval bestiary and publish it online. During the Middle Ages, bestiaries illustrated the qualities of animals (including mythic beings) in an encyclopedic fashion. In the process of creating our own bestiary, we are going to learn how to produce our own social theory – perhaps rethinking what we mean by “social” theory in the process. Consider this course an experiment in critical thinking and writing. While the majority of the written materials for this course will come from anthropology, we will also engage materials (visual and written) from other disciplines. In addition, we are going to engage materials curated by staff at Dartmouth’s Hood Museum of Art and the Rauner Special Collections Library.

Textbook(s)Required:

Haraway, Donna (2003) The Companion Species Manifesto. Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press. Raffles, Hugh (2011) Insectopedia. New York: Vintage Books. Flusser, Vilém and Louis Bec (2012) Vampyroteuthis Infernalis: A Treatise with a Report by the Institut Scientifique de Recherche Paranaturaliste (translated by Valentine A. Pakis). Minneapolis: Univ. of Minn. Press. Williams & Colomb Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace.

Art History

ARTH-07.02-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Kristin O'Rourke

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: ART

Description:

Paris in the 19th Century

This course will examine the city of Paris as the artistic capital of the nineteenth century, looking at artists and art production in the mid-late nineteenth century. We will focus on the art movements that made up the new category of “modern” art: Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. We will examine avant-garde art production in the works of Courbet, Manet, and the Impressionists, among others. We will investigate factors of contemporary life that affected subject matters, style, technique, and meaning in art works, in particular the invention of photography, urban planning and the modernization of the city of Paris, and the political and social situation in France and Europe. While exploring the impact of these factors on painting, photography, sculpture, and architecture, the course will look at alternative art practices and exhibitions that challenged the status quo and that became the basis of modern art. We will investigate what makes Paris in the 19th century “modern” and trace how characteristics of modernism continue to define the art world up to today.

No required textbooks available

Asian/Mideast Lang/Lit

AMEL-07.01-01 Jerusalem: Vision & Reality

Hour: 10A Instructor: Lewis Glinert

Requirements Met: WCult: NW; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Jerusalem: Vision and Reality

Jerusalem has always mesmerized minds—Royal City of Solomon, mystical core of the world, site of a foretold apocalypse, twice rased to the ground, focus of Jewish messianic dreams, since 1948 once more a Jewish capital but still savagely fought over. In this course, we will sample the symbolism of Jerusalem in Jewish, Christian and Islamic intellectual and artistic expression, from the Bible down to the present. Why has this city evoked such passions? Assignments: two 1,000 word papers (each involving re-drafting) and one 2,000 word paper

No required textbooks available

Biology

BIOL-07.08-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Lawrence Myers

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

The Biological Impact of Modern Environments and Lifestyle on Human Health

In this course, we will consider some core questions about how our modern lifestyles influence our health through altering our fundamental biology. The last 100 years have seen a remarkable changes in the way that a majority of human beings around the globe live their lives. Many of these changes have been dramatically positive. Increased lifespans, decreased infant mortality, higher standards of living are only some of the benefits largely brought about by technological advancements. Medicine has gone from a practice based solely on experiential knowledge to one firmly rooted in sound scientific principles. The overall health benefits of our modern lifestyle are unquestionable. However, the millions of years of evolution that went into shaping human/primate physiology occurred under living conditions that differ dramatically from the lives most of us live today. Biomedical research in the last 15 years has revealed interactions between our modern environment and lifestyle with our fundamental cellular biology that are both fascinating and unexpected. This research has also exposed potential health hazards associated with our modern lifestyle as well as unprecedented opportunities to manage disease. The popular press, secondary literature, and companies selling health-related products/services have often made spectacular claims related to this research. Through researching the primary data we will seek to ascertain to what degree these claims substantiated by actual scientific evidence and communicate our findings using an objective writing voice. Among the specific topics we will address are:
Microbiomes - How does the community of microbes that lives within us and upon us impact our health? and how might the widespread use of antibiotics and other aspects of our ‘sanitary’ lifestyle affect this community?
Epigenetics - We are certainly aware that certain lifestyle decisions and environmental exposures can impact our personal health. It has long been known that mutagens, such as cigarette smoke and radiation, can result in changes to our genomes that can be passed on to future generations. What has only recently been appreciated is that certain behaviors and environmental exposures that don’t change our genome can also impact the health of our descendants. What is the evidence for these phenomena occur as described? If true, the implications on public health could be far reaching.
Allergies – Ask your Grandparents whether any of their primary school classmates had food allergies and they most likely look at you quizzically. Today’s elementary schools, however, are seemingly filled with nut-free zones and special accommodations for innumerable sensitivities. Is there something in particular that has changed over the past 60-70 years to account for these changes? Theories abound and data exists. We will seek to evaluate what is really known about this phenomenon.
Sedentary Lifestyle – Close to 70% of the workforce in the U.S. in 1850 was involved in farming. Today that number is close to 1%. Accompanying this change in labor patterns are continually increasing ‘screen time’ both at home and at work. The result –a good portion of the population spends most of our day seated. Some data indicates the impact of this lifestyle is startling. If true, these data should make us rethink the way we conduct our everyday life.
Within this context the writing assignments in this course will focus on developing the skills necessary to comprehensively search the primary biomedical literature to both identify relevant data and assess its trustworthiness, and write in an objective voice that directly relates data to a testable scientific claim.

Textbook(s)Required:

No textbook required.

Chemistry

CHEM-07.01-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Fredrick Kull

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

Science and Society

Although science has profoundly influenced society and societal change, its very existence is at the whim of society. Clearly, only a scientifically knowledgeable populace can make wise decisions about scientific issues, however, the majority of society (the populace, much of academia, high levels of government) is ignorant of science and its role in society. Unfortunately, the media tends to focus on the sensational, adding to the confusion.

This seminar will probe issues at the societal/science interface, e.g.: technology, population, environment, health, behavior, race, gender, ethics/morality, fraud/misconduct, politics, public awareness, creationism vs evolution, education, climate change, the Anthropocene, epigenetics.

Four papers are required: 200 words on each of three tentative topics (600 words total). From these, after consultation with the instructor, secondary (1000 words), and primary (3000 words) topics will be selected. Finally, 100 words on each of the other students' papers plus a letter grade evaluation of each. (100 words x number of other students = total words). Students will briefly present on their primary topics and lead a discussion of the topic.

A mini-course covering periods before student presentations will be conducted including a panel of working scientists who will attempt to answer students' questions

No required textbooks available

Comparative Literature

COLT-07.12-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Sara Munoz

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

“What Have I Done to Deserve This?” On Marginal & Disreputable Women in 19th Century Literature

The European nineteenth century gave rise to a vast number of literary works with women in an unusual leading role. Moving away from the model of the perfect wife –that selfless, sacrificial woman devoted solely to flatter and comfort the male figure—these heroines appropriate the freedom to speak, to imagine, to desire, and to travel physically –through the text and through different geographical and metaphorical spaces across social and cultural borders in a movement perceived by the narrator as a threat, an anomaly. What do authors do with women who, far from complying with the image of the angel of the home, break all social conventions, challenge the status quo, decide to leave home, take to the street, reject marriage, take a lover, or simply read and educate themselves? Where do authors locate these New Women who “disturb” them? What fate do they deserve? As Virginia Woolf put it in her speech “Professions for Women,” “it was she who bothered me and so tormented me that at last I killed her”. Following nineteenth-century literary practices to restore order, “killing” a woman meant restraining her development and locating her on the margins, a symbolic resolution achieved by means of marriage, containment in the domestic sphere, domestication of sexual desires, prostitution, silencing the female voice, and/or physical degradation.

This will be the main topic around which we will integrate activities of reading, research, discussion, and composition. This First Year Seminar is especially a writing course in which you will learn to write by engaging the content –the presence and relevance of “bad women” in European literature. Deep learning of this content will occur through reading and writing, and in order to that, you will learn how to absorb new complex contents through reading and research and how to construct meaning by writing about your recently learned materials. In this course, disreputable women and writing cannot be separated! This integration of reading, researching, and writing is the foundation of the course. So, be ready to, not just criticize and empathize, but read and write a lot of assignments about a lot of bad, unruly and fun women!

No required textbooks available

Earth Sciences

EARS-07.01-01

Hour: 9L Instructor: Susan Taylor

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

The Solar System

The solar system consists of our Sun, eight planets, many moons and an unknown number of smaller bodies such as asteroids, comets, and Kuiper belt objects. One of the planets, the Earth, has life. What do we know about these bodies? How do we know what we know? Through readings, lectures and discussions this class will explore how scientific discoveries regarding our solar system have profoundly altered our world-view. For example the heavens do not revolve around the Earth rather the Earth is one of many planets circling the Sun. The Sun is one star among billions in our galaxy, which in turn is only one galaxy in a space filled with galaxies. We will read and discuss science, science fiction and history of science books and articles to gain a multifaceted view of our place in the universe and how this view has changed over time.

Textbook(s)Required:

Book 1 - \u{201c}The Sidereal Messenger\u{201d} by Galileo Galilei Book 2 - \u{201c}T-Rex and the Crater of Doom\u{201d} by Walter Alvarez Book 3 - \u{201c}Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace\u{201d} by Joseph Williams

Engineering Sciences

ENGS-07.02-01

Hour: 10 Instructor: Mary Albert

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

Climate Change

Climate change has occurred naturally and frequently over the course of many time scales in the past. America today is engaged in a discussion of current climate change and its cause, ranging from calls for immediate action to denial. This course explores the published scientific literature on the nature and cause of climate change, potential impacts on us, and the implications for our nation's energy issues. Through readings, class discussion, and individual research, we will explore this complex problem; student writing will synthesize results from the literature to clarify the factual basis for their own understanding. Reading will include a number of published papers and selections from textbooks. Students will be required to actively participate in class by leading class discussions and actively engaging in small group activities. In addition students will write two short papers, develop an annotated bibliography, and write a research paper based on the research completed for the annotated bibliography.

Textbook(s)Required:

Earth: The Operator’s Manual, R. Alley, 2011, W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0393081095. Amazon: $21.92 Also available as an e-book on Kindle. Style the Basics of Clarity and Grace, 4th edition, J. M. Williams and G.C. Colomb, 2010. ISBN 0205830765. Amazon: $64.06

English

ENGL-07.03-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Lynda Boose

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: None

Description:

Focus on Hamlet: Text and Film

No work of English literature—possibly no work of literature in any language—has been as influential, world-wide, as has this one play of William Shakespeare’s that was written (we believe) in 1603. And in this course, we will have the luxury of granting exclusive focus to this one play, its textual variants, its various filmic versions, and even some of its adaptations/spinoffs/re-visions. Students will learn how to create a video by editing film clips; they will spend time in Special Collections learning about the vagaries of 17th century textual editing; they will watch a series of streamed films of the play; they will participate in in-class readings of scenes; they will write formal papers, and finally, either singularly or in collaborative groups, they will create an original presentation to be put on for the class at the end of term.

No required textbooks available

ENGL-07.04-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Aden Evens

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Literature of the Machine

This seminar focuses on writing the academic essay, taking as subject matter novels and stories concerned with machines and technologies. We will read texts by Shelley, Wells, Vonnegut, Carter, Kafka, and more, splitting class time between open-ended discussion of those works and group critique of student writing. Students contribute most of the content to this class, where active learning is required.

No required textbooks available

ENGL-07.06-01

Hour: 12 Instructor: Andrew McCann

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Literature and the Culture of Catastrophe

How have the catastrophic political events of the twentieth century forced writers to rethink the possibilities and the limitations of literary expression? In this course we will look at a series of texts, written after the Second World War, and think about the ways in which their experimental qualities respond to the traumatic experience of military conflict, totalitarianism, terrorism, and other forms of political violence. The course addresses the question of literature’s ongoing relevance to a wide variety of recent political contexts and events. It will also ask students to consider the various registers in which readers might use literary texts to develop a relationship to their history, or to the history of others.

Textbook(s)Required:

Roberto Bolano, Distant Star. New Directions (2004) ISBN-10: 0811215865/ISBN-13: 978-0811215862 J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace. Penguin Books (2008) ISBN-10: 0143115286/ISBN-13: 978-0143115281 Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five. Dial Press Trade Paperback; Reissue edition (1999) ISBN-10: 0385333846/ISBN-13: 978-0385333849

ENGL-07.19-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Thomas O'Malley

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: LIT

Description:

The Irish Short Story, Since 1960

Contemporary Irish fiction has moved to reflect the changes in the society that produces it. In the last century, Ireland has changed from a conservative, agricultural country to a modern, technologically aware one, from a colony of Great Britain to a free, democratic republic, and from one of the poorest nations in the world to one of its most prosperous. Many of the dramatic transformations that have taken place within the culture have occurred most recently and have altered the way Ireland presently perceives itself. Since the 1960s a wave of new writing has arisen in Ireland, most notable in the short story form, highlighting a movement away from many of the themes and elements that typified and expressed both the post-famine and post-civil war culture, and that illustrates the inherent conflict, struggle, diversity and dynamism of the contemporary Irish experience.

In this course we will explore fiction that reveals, illuminates, questions and considers these various transformations of cultural identity, through the Troubles, the great Diaspora of the late seventies and early eighties, to the nineties, the rise of the Celtic Tiger, and into the 21st century with the shift from the rural to the urban, the influx of divergent ethnicities, the new multiculturalism and, of particular interest, the emergence of woman’s voices in the culture.

We will also consider some historical and mythological context in order for us to understand the complexity of Ireland and help ground the unique and varied voices of the writers we will read. Writers will include Mary Lavin, Edna O’Brien, Julia O’Faolain, Ann Enright, Rita Kelly, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Patrick McCabe, Colum McCann, William Trevor, John Banville, John McGahern, Roddy Doyle, Neil Jordan, and Colm Tóibin.

No required textbooks available

ENGL-07.23-01

Hour: 11 Instructor: J Martin Favor

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

1925

In the middle of the “Roaring Twenties” a diverse group of American authors published a variety of books that still stand as some of the most important American texts of the twentieth century. The class will focus on books published in the year 1925 and investigate what they might tell us about The United States’ image of itself in that period, the social, intellectual and artistic mood of the time, and the ways in which the kinds of questions these books raised 90 years ago still remain relevant for us today.

Among the texts publish in 1925 that we may consider for this class are: Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House, John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time, Alain Locke’s The New Negro, and Anita Loos’ Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. In addition to carefully reading, and writing about these texts, students can expect to research and give short class presentations on issues and contexts that will add another layer to our understanding of this time and these books. Topics might include: modernism, prohibition, the Red Scare, women’s suffrage, immigration and movements for racial justice.

No required textbooks available

Environmental Studies

ENVS-07.02-01 Conservation&Sustainability

Hour: 12 Instructor: Coleen Fox

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: INT

Description:

From Gombe to the Galapagos – Conservation, Development, and Sustainability

This course investigates the challenges and opportunities associated with integrating the twin goals of biodiversity conservation and development in the Global South. As the course title suggests, we will look at cases ranging from the innovative Roots & Shoots program around Gombe National Park in Tanzania, to the contradictory outcomes of a flourishing eco-tourism industry in the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. After an introduction to the history of international conservation, we will focus on the ‘New Conservation Debate’, which goes beyond the polarizing ‘parks versus people’ debate to focus on the socio-cultural and ecological context and the issues surrounding project sustainability. By drawing on cases studies from around the world, students will gain a broad perspective on how the new debates are playing out in a variety of ecosystems and cultural contexts.

No required textbooks available

ENVS-07.03-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Terry Osborne

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Ecopsychology

This course will explore human psychology as a variable in the environmental crisis, an area of study known as “ecopsychology.” Ecopsychology posits a fundamental connection between the human psyche and the more-than-human world, and examines both the role our psyche plays in affecting the health of the planet, and the effect the degradation of natural world has in return on our psyche. By investigating the interactions between our psychological processes and the natural world, ecopsychology may offer new avenues toward a healthier and more sustainable life.

Students will be introduced to psychological and ecopsychological theories and will explore the most recent research in the journal Ecopsychology. They will assess the older theories and newer research not only in the context of their own lives, but also in texts written by Daniel Quinn, Terry Tempest Williams, and others. They will write academic analyses and personal reflections and narratives. They will spend some time outside of the classroom, discovering how ecopsychology applies to them personally. And they will also engage in a term-long group video project, which will connect them with an Upper Valley community partner to understand the ecopsychological effects of that partner’s work.

No required textbooks available

Film Studies

FILM-07.11-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Jodie Mack

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: ART

Description:

Defining Experimental Animation

This course will equip students with the facility to observe, analyze, and write about art using experimental animation as a lens through which to assess the contemporary conditions of art today. Through writing for different audiences, discussing films and writing as a group, and presenting information individually, students will gain a wide variety of written and oral skillsets useful not only for art criticism but also for all types of communication.

No required textbooks available

French

FREN-07.04-01 Louis XIV, Then & Now

Hour: 11 Instructor: J Kathleen Wine

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Louis XIV, Then and Now

France’s Sun King, the builder of Versailles, was also one of its greatest actors. Born to be king, the young Louis XIV nevertheless had to seize power, exerting his grip over a turbulent France by projecting a public image so dazzling that it has almost entirely eclipsed the man behind it. Was he a monster or gift from God? Pleasure-loving libertine or secretive workaholic? Architect of modern France or of the monarchy’s demise? In this course, we will discover contradictory answers to these questions as we explore representations of France’s most famous monarch by his contemporaries and by Louis himself. Each section will conclude with a modern take on Louis in film, fiction, or history, enabling us to reflect on the diverse meanings that have been attributed to the monarch’s memory in more recent times. Throughout the course, we will be asking questions about the power of images, the nature of power, individual and national identity, and the shifting boundaries between the public and private realms. Readings will include Saint-Simon, Molière, Racine, Sévigné, La Fontaine, Louis XIV, Voltaire, and Dumas and films by Rossellini, Tavernier, Roland Joffé, and Randall Wallace.

No required textbooks available

Geography

GEOG-07.12-01

Hour: 11 Instructor: Patricia Lopez

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: INT

Description:

Global Ties, Intimate Lives

Everyday experiences, as mundane as preparing our morning coffee, are impacted by globalization. But what, exactly, is “globalization”? What does it mean to say our individual lives are deeply intertwined with global processes? In this course, we will examine just a few of the global ties that are built, maintained, and exercised through economic, political, and social processes around the world. Through readings including op-eds, blog posts, popular novels, and academic articles, we will uncover some of the ways that global processes inform individual lives and how individuals are impacting global processes. In discussions and writing assignments, we will critically examine how globalization operates and what it means to speak and write about the “global intimate.” To do this, we will have several in-class writing assignments and workshops, an op-ed assignment, and a final paper. Each component of reading and writing is designed to help build you toward a well-crafted final paper.

Textbook(s)Required:

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. 2013. Americanah: A Novel. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Besky, Sarah. 2014. The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Tea Plantations in India. Berkeley, CA: University of CA Press

German

GERM-07.03-01 Narratives of the Artist

Hour: 10A Instructor: Bruce Duncan

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Narratives of the Artist

What is the nature of genius? How does one experience artistic creativity? Where does it originate, and what are its effects? How do artists differ from other people? Do they feel life more intensely, or are they tragically at odds with it? German authors have been fascinated with these questions—to the extent that even English-speaking critics use the term ""Künstlerroman"" to describe novels about artists. Within this genre, we find the creative genius portrayed as anything from a demonic force of nature to a hypersensitive aesthete, from an avatar of authentic existence to a swindler dealing in illusion. Each depiction exemplifies the historical period in which it came into being, as well as its author's individual approach to life and art and the relation between them. This seminar will examine some of the ways in which German writers from different literary periods have addressed the subject of artistic creation. We will read English translations of works like Goethe's Sorrows of Young Werther; E. T. A. Hoffmann's Councillor Krespel; Thomas Mann's Tristan, Tonio Kröger, The Wunderkind, and Dr. Faustus; and Patrick Süskind's Perfume.

Textbook(s)Required:

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: The Sufferings of Young Werther, translated by Harry Steinhauer. ISBN 0-393-09880-X. E. T. A. Hoffmann: The Tales of Hoffmann, translated by R. J. Hollingdale. ISBN 0-140-44392-4. Thomas Mann: Death in Venice and Other Tales, translated by Joachim Neugroschel. ISBN 0-14-118173-7. Thomas Mann: Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer, Adrian Leverk\u{fc}hn, As Told by a Friend, translated by John E. Woods. ISBN 0-375-70116-8. Patrick S\u{fc}skind: Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, translated by John E. Woods. ISBN 0-375-72584-9.

Government

GOVT-07.02-01 Nationalism in War

Hour: 2 Instructor: Jennifer Lind

Requirements Met: WCult: NW; Distrib: INT

Description:

Nationalism in War and Reconciliation

At the heart of political struggles between groups and countries lies identity. Communities create identities—myths, memories, heroes and villains—and manipulate them as the community pursues war or peace. In this seminar we will study how nationalism and group identity affects war-fighting and reconciliation. But the other key purpose of this first-year seminar is to introduce students to the academic world of ideas – to the verbal debate and exchange of ideas, to the written expression of ideas, and to the refining of ideas through a process of intellectual development and revision. At the center of this endeavor is close interaction and the fostering of a sense of intellectual community, both among student colleagues and with the professor.

No required textbooks available

History

HIST-07.09-01

Hour: 3B Instructor: George Trumbull

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: INT or SOC

Description:

Pirates and Piracy in Global Historical Perspective

Pirates have operated from coastlines around the world throughout history, including in contemporary times. What did and does it mean to be a pirate? Why did people choose to live as bandits on ships, and how did they live their lives? From the Red Sea to the Mediterranean to the coasts of China to the Gulf Coast, pirates functioned as political agents, economic engines, jail-keepers, rogues, and, of course, objects of popular fascination. What roles did pirates play in relation to states whose very authority they contested? This seminar will investigate the history of pirates as social actors and as subjects of cultural representation, as political meddlers and as economic entrepreneurs, in various epochs and locales. Discussions and readings will situate the development of piracy and the lives of pirates in specific histories, and will extrapolate on the origins and meanings of piracy in the twenty-first century.

No required textbooks available

HIST-07.18-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Walter Simons

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Eco's Echoes: The Middle Ages in Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose" and "Baudolino"

Centered on the study of two exciting novels by Umberto Eco,"The Name of the Rose" (1980, filmed in 1987), a murder mystery set in a monastery, and "Baudolino" (2000), an adventure story about the Fourth Crusade, this seminar explores the culture of the late Middle Ages for what it reveals about European civilization in the pre-modern age. Students will write three short essays and a research paper on a topic of their choice.

Textbook(s)Required:

Cohn, Norman. THE PURSUIT OF THE MILLENNIUM: REVOLUTIONARY MILLENARIANS AND MYSTICAL ANARCHISTS OF THE IDDLE AGES (2nd ed., Pimlico 2004), ISBN #9780712656641 Eco, Umberto, THE NAME OF THE ROSE (Harcourt Brace, 1995; 2005 1st Harvest ed.), ISBN #9780156001311 Eco, Umberto. BAUDOLINO (Harcourt, 2003), ISBN #9780156029063 Haft, Adele J. THE KEY TO "THE NAME OF THE ROSE": INCLUDING TRANSLATIONS OF ALL NON-ENGLISH PASSAGES (U. of Michigan Press, 1999), ISBN #9780472086214 Lawrence, C. H. MEDIEVAL MONASTICISM: FORMS OF RELIGIOUS LIFE IN WESTERN EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES (2nd ed. Addison Wesley/Longman, 1989), ISBN #0582017270

Humanities

HUM-002-01 The Classical Tradition

Hour: WX Instructor: Paul Carranza, J Kathleen Wine, Pramit Chaudhuri

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

For more information about Humanities 2, please see their website at: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~hums1-2/

No required textbooks available

HUM-002-02 The Classical Tradition (Discussion)

Hour: OT Instructor: Paul Carranza

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: None

No description available

Textbook(s)Required:

1) Pale Fire Author: Nabokov Publ.: Vintage ISBN 13: 978-0679723424 Amazon price: ca. $11 2) Ficciones Author: Borges Ed. Anthony Kerrigan. Publ.:New York: Grove, 1962. ISBN-10: 0802130305\u{200b}. 3) Mrs. Dalloway Woolf Publisher: bnpublishing.com (February 12, 2014) ISBN-13: 978-1607963462 Amazon price: $6.64 4) Absalom, Absalom Author:Faulkner Publ,: Vintage International ISBN13 9780679732181 5) Madame Bovary Author: Flaubert Trans. Cohen Publ.: Norton ISBN 13: 978-0393979176 Amazon price: $16.32 6) The Poems of Catullus Author: Catullus Trans. Peter Green Publ.: Univ. of California Press ISBN-13: 978-0520253865 Amazon price: $25.60

HUM-002-03 The Classical Tradition (Discussion)

Hour: OT Instructor: Pramit Chaudhuri

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: None

No description available

Textbook(s)Required:

1) Pale Fire Author: Nabokov Publ.: Vintage ISBN 13: 978-0679723424 Amazon price: ca. $11 2) Ficciones Author: Borges Ed. Anthony Kerrigan. Publ.:New York: Grove, 1962. ISBN-10: 0802130305\u{200b}. 3) Mrs. Dalloway Woolf Publisher: bnpublishing.com (February 12, 2014) ISBN-13: 978-1607963462 Amazon price: $6.64 4) Absalom, Absalom Author:Faulkner Publ,: Vintage International ISBN13 9780679732181 5) Madame Bovary Author: Flaubert Trans. Cohen Publ.: Norton ISBN 13: 978-0393979176 Amazon price: $16.32 6) The Poems of Catullus Author: Catullus Trans. Peter Green Publ.: Univ. of California Press ISBN-13: 978-0520253865 Amazon price: $25.60

HUM-002-04 The Classical Tradition (Discussion)

Hour: OT Instructor: J Kathleen Wine

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: None

No description available

Textbook(s)Required:

1) Pale Fire Author: Nabokov Publ.: Vintage ISBN 13: 978-0679723424 Amazon price: ca. $11 2) Ficciones Author: Borges Ed. Anthony Kerrigan. Publ.:New York: Grove, 1962. ISBN-10: 0802130305\u{200b}. 3) Mrs. Dalloway Woolf Publisher: bnpublishing.com (February 12, 2014) ISBN-13: 978-1607963462 Amazon price: $6.64 4) Absalom, Absalom Author:Faulkner Publ,: Vintage International ISBN13 9780679732181 5) Madame Bovary Author: Flaubert Trans. Cohen Publ.: Norton ISBN 13: 978-0393979176 Amazon price: $16.32 6) The Poems of Catullus Author: Catullus Trans. Peter Green Publ.: Univ. of California Press ISBN-13: 978-0520253865 Amazon price: $25.60

Jewish Studies

JWST-07.05-01

Hour: 10 Instructor: Michael McGillen

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Nietzsche and the Jews

Despite his anti-religious rhetoric, Friedrich Nietzsche’s relationship to Judaism was complex. Nietzsche had great respect for the Judaism of the Old Testament, which serves as a model for his Zarathustra, yet he criticized “priestly” Judaism for its life-negating moral values. Nevertheless, Nietzsche became an important figure for Jewish culture in the early 20th-century, inspiring writers such as Theodor Herzl, Franz Kafka, Micah Joseph Berdichevsky, and Martin Buber. The course will consider how Nietzsche provided an impetus for the reinvention of Jewish culture, even as he was appropriated by German fascists and anti-Semites. This First-year Seminar is designed to strengthen your academic writing abilities and provide an introduction to Jewish Studies. You will learn how to engage critically with your reading materials, generate ideas, develop them in writing, and revise your writing in order to communicate your ideas more effectively. At the end of class, you will have gained a new understanding not only of Nietzsche’s relationship to Jewish culture, but also of your own reading and writing process.

No required textbooks available

Music

MUS-07.05-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: William Cheng

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Video Game Music

This writing-intensive course offers an introduction to the craft and culture of video game audio. We will lend our ears to the imaginative ways in which music, sound, noise, and voice are employed and experienced in virtual gameworlds. Besides perusing scholarly literature on games and music, you will participate in gaming sessions and attend concerts. Assignments include mini-essays, a concert review, speed-writing exercises, an oral presentation, and a final paper. Proofreading and revision are important components of this course. You will have opportunities to write in expository, creative, and experimental modes; experiment with in casual and formal styles; present ideas in linear and hypertextual formats; and undertake independent as well as collaborative projects. The course is organized thematically rather than chronologically. Instead of aiming to attain an encyclopedic knowledge of games and game music, you will think deeply about topics such as virtuality, virtuosity, nostalgia, and violence with respect to music and games. A key goal will be to interrogate the roles of playfulness, boundaries, and innovation in gaming and writing alike.

No required textbooks available

Physics

PHYS-07.03-01 Space Politics

Hour: 10A Instructor: Mary Hudson

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TAS

Description:

Space Politics

This course will examine the political forces behind mankind's entry into space beginning with Sputnik and the inception of NASA; the Apollo program and unmanned planetary exploration; the role of the Air Force and CIA space reconnaissance programs; the decision to build the Space Shuttle as the primary US orbital launch vehicle, along with the Challenger and Columbia accidents and retirement of the shuttle; current reliance on Russian manned access to the International Space Station (ISS). The development and deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope will be studied as a prototype of large NASA programs, along with the ISS and the prospect for future manned missions back to the moon and to Mars or asteroids. The role of commercial enterprise in space exploration, for example SpaceX, will be explored. Reading includes chapters from Space Chronicles by Neil deGrasse Tyson, What Do You Care What Other People Think? by Richard Feynman, The Case for Mars by Robert Zubrin, and Packing for Mars by Mary Roach.

Textbook(s)Required:

Title: Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier Author: Neil deGrasse & Avis Lang ISBN: 978-0393350371 Amazon: New: 12.32 / Used: 6.00 The Case for Mars: The Plan to Settle the Red Planet and Why We Must Author: Robert Zubrin & Arthur Clark ISBN: 978-1451608113 Amazon: New: 13.26 / Used: 1.29 Title: Packing Mars Author: Mary Roach ISBN: 978-0393339918 Amazon: New: 12.73 / Used: 8.50 Title: What Do You Care What Other People Think?: Further Adventures of a Curious Character Author: Richard Feynaman & Ralph Leighton ISBN: 978-0393320923 Amazon: New: 12.89 / Used: 10.50

Psychological & Brain Sciences

PSYC-07.03-01

Hour: 11 Instructor: John Pfister

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Credulity: Science, Pseudoscience, and Thinking Critically About Human Behavior

Despite little, no, or even contrary evidence, a large number of pseudoscientific and otherwise dubious psychological practices and areas of study have caught the public's attention during the last two decades (Lilienfeld, Lohr, & Morier, 2001). Claims of such things as recovered memories, facilitated communication, extrasensory perception, alien abduction, communication with the deceased, homeopathic remedies, and New Age psychotherapies have gained increasing popularity in the mass media and among the general public. Why do such beliefs persist, and how do we evaluate new claims in science? This course will give students the tools to make their own decisions regarding what would constitute sufficient evidence for belief. Statistical and methodological arguments will be emphasized. Readings may include selections from Psychobabble and Biobunk (Tavris), 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, and Beyerstein), 50 Popular Beliefs that People Think are True (Harrison), and Flim-Flam (Randi). In addition, students will draw from original journal articles and the popular press to build their own library for skeptical analysis.

Textbook(s)Required:

1. Title: 50 Popular beliefs that people think are true, by Guy P. Harrison, Ed. 1, 2009; ISBN: 978-1-61614-495-1 Approximate Cost: $14.44 (paperback) 2. Title: 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology, by Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio & Beyerstein; Wiley –Blackwell; 2009; ISBN: 978-1-4051-3112-4 Approximate Cost: $19.79 3. Title: The Believing Brain, by Michael Shermer, Times Books Henry Holt and Co., LLC. ISBN: 978-0-8050-9125-0 Approximate Cost: $20.97

Religion

REL-07.05-01

Hour: 2A Instructor: Susan Ackerman

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: TMV

Description:

The English Bible

In this course, we will study first the earliest Bibles produced in England (and southern Scotland), focusing in depth on the most beautiful and most important: the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Codex Amiatinus, and the Book of Kells. Second, we will study the history of the rendering of these and other early Latin Bibles into English, culminating with the famous King James Version, commissioned in 1611 by King James VI of Scotland/James I of England. Refining students' skills in college-level writing is an important objective of this course, and so assignments include several writing exercises: two 2000-word research papers and four short 500-word reflection papers. Assignments also include two in-class oral reports.

No required textbooks available

Russian

RUSS-07.05-01

Hour: 11 Instructor: John Kopper

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Scapegoats

We have all read about scapegoating, sometimes witnessed it, sometimes participated in it, and sometimes been scapegoated ourselves. In this seminar we will explore the human mechanism—and ritual—of assigning blame, and look at ways that scapegoats define us in relation to family, religion, gender, nation, and history. The class will likely read Isaac Babel's short stories, Faulkner's Light in August, Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, and Nabokov's Invitation to a Beheading.

No required textbooks available

Sociology

SOCY-07.01-01 Race and Ethnicity

Hour: 10 Instructor: Emily Walton

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Race and Ethnicity in the United States: Social Constructions and Social Realities

In this course we start from the premise that racial and ethnic distinctions are a social construction. We also explore the very real consequences of racial distinctions by interpreting the social science literature on inequality, considering the manifestations of interpersonal and institutional forms of racism, and discussing prospects for change in the future. Students will also examine their own racial and ethnic identity and experiences through the lens of a social scientist. Students are required to interpret class readings, perform short critical writing responses, evaluate others' work, facilitate and participate in class discussion, and write one 5-7 page reflective essay, and one 8-10 page research paper.

Textbook(s)Required:

none

Spanish

SPAN-07.02-01

Hour: 10 Instructor: Douglas Moody

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: ART

Description:

Transforming Public Space: Mural Art in Mexico and the United States

Since the early twentieth century, mural art in urban landscapes and institutional spaces in Mexico and the United States have been the sites of extraordinary creativity and intense controversy. These are the concrete canvases where stories are told, identities are asserted, and communities are imagined. This course begins with a focus on the work of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera, who began their careers in Mexico, but who also produced significant and highly politicized art in the US, and we will also consider the work of David Alfaro Siqueiros, the third member of “Los tres grandes.” We will analyze many reproductions of los tres grandes’ mural art and view videos and films that illustrate their lives and work and we will study how the mural art movement has influenced later generations of Latino/a mural and graffiti artists in the United States. We will draw upon a variety of interdisciplinary readings from the areas of Cultural Studies, the social sciences, history, art, and literature, including: Judith Baca, Pierre Bourdieu, Jean Charlot, Mary Coffey, Laurance Hurlburt, Alan Knight, and Desmond Rochfort.

No required textbooks available

Theater

THEA-07.01-01 Theater for Social Change

Hour: 11 Instructor: Mara Sabinson

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Theater for Social Change

This course will trace particular developments in American and Western European Theater from the First World War through the present. Artists and theater groups under consideration will be those whose work has focused on contemporary social conditions and the potential of performance to effect social change. In addition, students will experiment with developing scripts and performances based on current events. Readings will include selections from the writings of Erwin Piscator, Bertolt Brecht, The Federal Theatre Project, Harold Pinter, Augusto Boal, etc. as well as newspapers, news magazines, and other media sources. In addition to creative and critical writing, students will be assigned one major research project. Emphasis will be on class participation.

No required textbooks available

THEA-07.01-02 Theater for Social Change

Hour: 2 Instructor: Mara Sabinson

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Theater for Social Change

This course will trace particular developments in American and Western European Theater from the First World War through the present. Artists and theater groups under consideration will be those whose work has focused on contemporary social conditions and the potential of performance to effect social change. In addition, students will experiment with developing scripts and performances based on current events. Readings will include selections from the writings of Erwin Piscator, Bertolt Brecht, The Federal Theatre Project, Harold Pinter, Augusto Boal, etc. as well as newspapers, news magazines, and other media sources. In addition to creative and critical writing, students will be assigned one major research project. Emphasis will be on class participation.

No required textbooks available

Women's and Gender Studies

WGST-07.02-01

Hour: 3B Instructor: Klaus Milich

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Masculinities Go In Between

Reviewing publications on “manhood” or “manliness,” one is struck by the fact how often changes in the under-standing of the concepts are perceived as “crises of masculinity” rather than as symptoms of historical change. This course will elaborate on how notions of men, manhood, manliness, and masculinity have changed in response to economic, demographic, social, cultural, and territorial changes. We will discuss aspects such as the formation of manhood in America, constructions of the racialized male body, the functions of male femininity and female mas-culinity in the reconsideration of gender, and follow the debate on male violence in hip-hop culture. Designed as a First-year Seminar, however, we will not only focus on “what masculinity is,” but simultaneously scrutinize the strategies of scholarship in the development of masculinity studies.

No required textbooks available

Writing Program

WRIT-07.10-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Jennifer Sargent

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TMV

Description:

The Ethics of Power

With power comes responsibility -- responsibility to do the right thing. What is "the right thing" when a person in power has to manage competing interests? In this seminar, we will consider this question in a number of contexts. We will discuss the formal and informal ethics rules in professions of power and how and why individuals in those professions abide by or neglect to follow those rules. We will guide our inquiry with three case studies: 1) Former Prosecutor Michael Nifong's conduct in the "Duke Lacrosse Rape Case"; 2) Former NY Governor Eliot Spitzer's downfall due to his involvement with a prostitute while in office; and 3) Former State Forensic Chemist Annie Dookhan’s evidence tampering in hundreds of criminal case. You will learn the importance of technical writing in the context of law and policy. You will experience writing in the voice and with the style of a scholar in the disciplines of law, policy and government. You will come to understand that persuasive writing incorporates clarity of topic, factual precision, and organization in analysis. You will actively participate in the exchange of feedback, critique and collaborative learning with your classmates. Texts for this class include Until Proven Innocent by Stuart Taylor Jr. and KC Johnson, Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer by Peter Elkind, and a special case packet with multiple actual court and investigation documents, as well as newspaper and other media accounts, in the Annie Dookhan case. The use of laptops in this classroom is strongly discouraged.

Textbook(s)Required:

Taylor, Stuart and K.C. Johnson. Until Proven Innocent , St. Martin's Griffin, 2008 1st ED. ISBN: 978-0312384869.
Elkind, Peter. Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot , Portfolio Trade, 2010. ISBN: 978-1591843924 .

WRIT-07.11-01

Hour: 10A Instructor: Klaus Milich

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

From Modernism to Postmodernism

Fredric Jameson once described postmodernity as “the effort to take the temperature of the age without instruments and in a situation in which we are not even sure there is so coherent a thing as an ‘age,’ or ‘zeitgeist’ any longer.” Taking the temperature of the age through a comparative reading of modern and postmodern American literature, we will try to seize the change from one era and movement to the other by way of elucidating a number of modern and postmodern concepts, such as “the exhaustion of literature,” “the death of author,” “the world as text,” “the end of meta-narratives,” or “literary self-reflexion.” Movies, art works, and some theoretical texts will enhance the literary readings and the comparative perspective, which includes texts by modern and postmodern writers such as James, Faulkner, Stein, Hemingway, Abish, Fowles, and Pynchon.

Textbook(s)Required:

Faulkner, William. The Sound and the Fury, W.W. Norton & Co., 1993 2nd ED. ISBN: 978-0393964813.
Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying of Lot 49, Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006 ED. ISBN: 978-0060913076.
Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises, Scribner; First Edition Thus, 2006 ED. ISBN: 978-0743297332.