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First-Year Seminar Descriptions for Spring Term 2014

First-Year Seminars offer every Dartmouth first-year student an opportunity to participate in a course structured around independent research, small group discussion, and intensive writing. Below you will find a list of the courses being offered next term.

Afr & AfrAmerican Studies

AAAS-007-01 Postcolonial Dialogues

Hour: 10A Instructor: Ayo Coly

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: INT or LIT

Description:

Colonial and Postcolonial Dialogues

This course examines the implication of literature in the colonial encounter and the literary representations of this event. We will read classical texts of European colonialism in dialogue with postcolonial texts from Africa, the Caribbean and Asia. We will begin with an exploration of the literature of empire and look at the ways in which colonialism shaped some canonical European texts. We will then study the range of literary responses emerging from French and British colonies in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. Our study will be organized around the themes of representation, identity, power, race, gender, and resistance. Readings include Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Joyce Cary's Mister Johnson, Aimé Césaire's A Tempest, William Shakespeare's The Tempest, Maryse Condé's Windward Heights, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and Zadie Smith's White Teeth.

Textbook(s)Required:

Achebe, Chinua. Arrow of God. Bronte, Emily. Wuthering Heights. Cary, Joyce. Mister Johnson. Cesaire, Aime. A Tempest. Conde, Maryse. Windward Heights. Shakespeare, Williams. The Tempest. Smith, Zadie. White Teeth.

Art History

ARTH-007-01 !Orozco!

Hour: 10A Instructor: Mary Coffey

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: ART

Description:

!Orozco! The Art of Jose Clemente Orozco

This seminar focuses on the visual art produced by the Mexican artist Jose Clemente Orozco. Not only will students be studying a wide range of visual art media (from painting and fresco to printmaking, drawing, and other kinds of work on paper), but also they will be working all term long with a single print housed in the Hood Museum of Art's collection. The goals for the course, beyond enhancing writing skills, is to introduce students to the study of visual art, to the specialized terminology that we use in Art History, to a variety of techniques for seeing and describing the visual, and to the importance of media and viewing context for understanding a work of art.

Textbook(s)Required:

Title: The Underdogs - A Novel of the Mexican Revolution Author: Azuela, Mariano ISBN-10: 1-60597-538-9 ISBN-13: 978-1-60597-538-2 Format: Paperback Publisher: Standard Publications, Incorporated Publication Date: May 2008 Price: $10.95 AND Title: Jose Clemente Orozco: An Autobiography Author: Orozco, Jose Clemente ISBN-10: 0-486-41819-7 ISBN-13: 978-0-486-41819-3 Format: Paperback - Trade paperback (US) Publisher: Dover Publications, Incorporated Publication Date: Dec 2001 Price: $10.95

Biology

BIOL-007-01 The Troubled Helix

Hour: 10A Instructor: Edward Berger

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

The Troubled Helix: The Use and Abuse of Genetics

Genetics explains how similarities and differences are passed on from one generation to the next. Genetics also provides a technology that can predict, diagnose and even treat human genetics maladies, and that can create novel life forms, so-called "transgenics." But genetics also has a dark side that has been used as a social weapon to explain and even justify social inequality and bad behavior; "my genes made me do it." In this course we will explore a number of topics, including genetically modified foods, human genetic testing and gene therapy, the genetic basis of IQ, and the evolution/intelligent design debate. There will be 2 short and 1 long writing assignment (a total of ~6,000 words) and an oral presentation.

Textbook(s)Required:

No textbook required

Classical Studies

CLST-007-01 How to Read an Epic

Hour: 11 Instructor: Pramit Chaudhuri

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: INT or LIT

Description:

How to Read an Epic

Epic is everywhere: Hollywood adaptations of classical and modern epics from The Iliad to Game of Thrones, poems and novels that span generations, continents, and even worlds, and computer games based on the characteristic structures of the epic plot—adversity, discovery, violence, triumph. In this course we will learn how the key components of epic poetry work by referring to canonical examples from Homer to Milton with excursions into modernity and other media besides poetry. We will seek to understand the function of both mainstream and esoteric features of the genre—battle scenes, feasts, funerals, games, prophecies, and visits to the underworld—as well as the interrelations between ancient and modern art forms. If you want the world's greatest genre to play a role in your academic curriculum or in your creative interests—whether film, writing, dance, or anything else—then this is the course for you. The principal writing assignments are an annotated bibliography, a detailed analysis of a scholarly article, an abstract of your final paper, a presentation, and the final paper itself.

Textbook(s)Required:

No required textbooks.

Comparative Literature

COLT-007-01 Global Detective

Hour: 2A Instructor: Jonathan Smolin

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: INT or LIT

Description:

The Global Detective

Since the 1990s, police fiction has become one of the world's most popular literary genres. While the form's basic narrative structure is recognizable from America to Africa, each literary and cultural tradition localizes the genre in its own particular way. In this seminar, we will examine recent police novels from Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, exploring how these texts represent and interrogate challenges that have arisen because of globalization. We will begin by examining the origins of the genre in the United States and then trace its localization in diverse cultural contexts. We will explore how the global police novel has formed a rich literary vehicle for exploring critical themes such as immigration, hybridity, postcolonialism, civil war, and terrorism. Although our primary texts are works of popular fiction, our discussions will situate them in social, cultural, and literary theories of globalization.

Textbook(s)Required:

1. McBain, Ed. Cop Hater. 978-1612183701. $13.95 2. Mankell, Henning. Faceless Killers. 978-1400031573. $14.95 3. Miyabe, Miyuki. All She Was Worth. 978-0395966587. $13.95 4. Yasmina Khadra. Morituri. ISBN: 978-1592640355. $12.95 5. Joseph Williams and Gregory Colomb. Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace. 4th Edition. ISBN: 978-0205830763. $25 6. Wayne C. Booth, Gregory Colomb, Joseph Williams. Craft of Research. 3rd Edition. ISBN: 978-0226065663. $17

COLT-007-02 Uncanny Tales

Hour: 10 Instructor: Ulrike Rainer

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Imagination Unbound: Fantastic and Uncanny Tales

The imaginary and supernatural has fascinated writers throughout cultures and the ages. This seminar will focus on the writings of poets and authors who were masters in the genre, for example, Edgar Allen Poe, Franz Kafka, Mary Shelley, Henry James and many others. We will focus on close reading and examine the relationship between literary creations and reality. Emphasis will be on class discussions. There will be three short written assignments (3-5 pages) each of which will be corrected and may then be re-written, and a final paper (5-8 pages) at the end of the term.

Textbook(s)Required:

E.T.A. Hoffmann, Short Stories, trans. R.J. Hollingdale. Penguin Books, N.Y.,1982. ISBN 0140443924 Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, Norton Critical Edition, N.Y., 2012. ISBN 9780393927931 Henry James, The Turn of the Screw, Norton Critical Edition, N.Y., 1998. ISBN 039395904X Franz Kafka, The Transformation and other Stories, trans. Malcolm Pasley, Penguin Books, N.Y., 1992. ISBN 0140184783

Computer Science

COSC-007-01 Ideas, Ideals, & Comp Sci

Hour: 2 Instructor: Carey Heckman

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Ideas, Ideals, and Computer Science

Based on the view that the foundation of computer science is not computer science but the problems computer science seeks to solve and how computer science can help solve them, this seminar explores the ideas, values, and visions of computer science. Algorithms, programming languages, automata theory, computation, database and information systems, distributed systems, networks, and open source software development and distribution will be among the areas studied.

Our primary objective will be better understanding computer science in the context of a Dartmouth liberal arts education, and thus what computer science can teach us about truth, beauty, our universe, ourselves as humans, and our place as humans in our universe and, to paraphrase John Sloan Dickey, how we can be liberated from the meanness and meagerness of mere existence. Our intellectual journey will also provide constant opportunities to hone critical thinking, analytic, and writing skills.

No technical knowledge will be required or assumed. An interest in the connection between the human condition and computer science is essential, however.

Textbook(s)Required:

Textbooks (both required): 1. On the Origin of Objects, by Brian C. Smith (MIT Press, 1998), ISBN:0-262-69209-0 2. The Cathedral and the Bazaar (2nd Ed.), by Eric S. Raymond (O'Reilly, 2001), ISBN:0-596-00108-8

Engineering Sciences

ENGS-007-01 Medical Imaging

Hour: 12 Instructor: Keith Paulsen

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TAS

Description:

Medical Imaging

Medical imaging has evolved significantly over the last 100 years and has transformed modern medical practice to the extent that very few clinical decisions are made without relying on information obtained with contemporary imaging modalities. The future of medical imaging may be even more promising as new technologies are being developed to observe the structural, functional and molecular characteristics of tissues at finer and finer spatial scales. This first-year seminar will review the historical development of modern radiographic imaging and discuss the basic physical principles behind common approaches such as CT, Ultrasound and MRI. Contemporary issues surrounding the use of imaging to screen for disease, the costs to the health care system of routine application of advanced imaging technology and the benefits of the information provided by medical imaging in terms of evidence-based outcomes assessment will be explored. Students will be required to read, present and discuss materials in class and write position papers articulating and/or defending particular perspectives on the historical development of medical imaging and its contemporary and/or future uses and benefits.

Textbook(s)Required:

Should I Be Tested for Cancer? Maybe Not and Here's Why, HG. Welch, UC Press Berkeley: U. of California Press, Paperback. ISBN 0520248368. Amazon: $18.86 Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health, Welch, Schwartz and Woloshin, ISBN 978-0-8070-21996. Amazon: $12.06

English

ENGL-007-01 Narrating Slave Rebellion

Hour: 10 Instructor: Alysia Garrison

Requirements Met: WCult: NW; Distrib: INT or LIT

Description:

Atlantic Slavery, Atlantic Freedom: Narrating Slave Rebellion in History and Fiction

Violently resist, or passively acquiesce in hopes of winning favor as a "grateful slave"? Hollywood has recently explored such grey zones in Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained (2012) and Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave (2013). The National Book Award recognized as its 2013 winner James McBride's The Good Lord Bird, a historical novel that reimagines the story of abolitionist John Brown. In this course we will study literary texts that imagine episodes of slave rebellion in the Caribbean and the Americas across two centuries: from the early seventeenth-century transatlantic crossings of slaves and servants to the New World; to Tacky's Revolt and its place in what Vincent Brown has recently called the "Coromantee Archipelago" in eighteenth-century slave rebellion; to the spectacular soundings of the Haitian Revolution in the late eighteenth century; to the messianic prophecies of Nat Turner and Sam Sharpe in the early nineteenth century; to slave rebellions at sea; and finally to what an opinion editor in the New York Times has called the "terrorism" of John Brown in the American Civil War. The course is designed to familiarize you with the conventions of academic discourse to help you learn to read and write at a college level. Along the way, you will be introduced to a range of literary genres from historical fiction to magical realism. We will focus on techniques of close and careful reading of primary texts, but will also situate stories and novels in a range of historical, cultural, and conceptual media to promote research skills. Writing assignments will consist of four formal essays and a variety of informal assignments to encourage the habit of daily writing. Through collaborative workshops, students will participate in peer critique and revise drafts of papers.

No required textbooks available

ENGL-007-02 Icelandic Sagas

Hour: 12 Instructor: Peter Travis

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Icelandic Sagas

This seminar focuses on the greatest family sagas written down in the golden age of Icelandic literature, the twelfth and thirteen centuries, although the historical materials of the sagas derive from the Age of Settlement—the ninth and tenth centuries. We are concerned with the literary merits of the sagas themselves, and the ways these sagas reflect the legal, social, cultural, technological, religious/mythic and erotic concerns and tensions of that period.

No required textbooks available

ENGL-007-03 New American Short Story

Hour: 10A Instructor: Catherine Tudish

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: LIT

Description:

The New American Short Story

Beginning with an overview of the American short story tradition, the course will focus on fiction written in the last 30 years, with special emphasis on the contributions of immigrant and minority writers, such as Sandra Cisneros, Sherman Alexie, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Ha Jin. Written assignments will involve close reading and analysis of texts and culminate with a personal, reflective narrative.

Textbook(s)Required:

40 Short Stories: A Portable Anthology, 4th edition Edited by Beverly Lawn Bedford/St. Martin's Press

ENGL-007-04 Toni Morrison

Hour: 10A Instructor: Shalene Vasquez

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: LIT

Description:

A Critical Exploration of Toni Morrison

This course is an in-depth study of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison's major fictional works. We will examine Morrison's most foundational and influential novels alongside a relatively recent text. In so doing, we will be able to closely explore formal and ideological changes in Morrison's oeuvre. We will also read critical responses to Morrison's writing. Required texts will include Sula, Song of Solomon, Beloved, A Mercy, Conversations with Toni Morrison, and selected essays. Central to our exploration will be an analysis of Morrison's observation that "the past affects the present." Therefore, we will explore the social and historical factors that contribute to Morrison's artistic constructions. Some of the issues we will examine include alternative constructions of female community and genealogy, and representations of race, class, nationhood, and identity in an American context. To this end, in order to hone students' research and writing skills, students will complete an annotated bibliography and two research essays.

No required textbooks available

Environmental Studies

ENVS-007-01 COVER Stories

Hour: 2A Instructor: Terry Osborne

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SOC

Description:

COVER Stories: Community Building and the Environment

This community-based learning course will expose students to the interaction between transformative stories, community-building work, and environmental action, and it will let students apply what they've learned through their own work in Upper Valley communities. To do this the class will team up with a local organization called COVER, which does home repair projects for low-income, disabled and elderly residents of the Upper Valley, and whose mission is to "build community and foster hope through cooperation and fellowship." To start the term students will study the growing relationship between environmentalism and social justice, and also work on a COVER home-repair project; in the middle of the term, students will look at the power of stories in building communities, and then at the role of an ethnographer in recording those stories; toward the end of the term the students will take what they've learned into Upper Valley communities. In order to help COVER assess how well it is meeting its mission’s goals, they will create short video stories based on interviews with members of the COVER community. Readings in the course will range from Dorsey et al's "The Soul of Environmentalism" to Putnam's Bowling Alone to Ganz's "Why Stories Matter." There will be several guest lectures to guide students through this multi-faceted project. And the course will culminate in a class presentation of its projects to members of the COVER community.

This course is best suited to students who are, or want to be, adventurous; who are, or want to be, activists. You will need to devote at least one weekend day during the term to a work project, and you will need to have time outside of class to devote to the video project. If you are a college-approved driver, or can become one by the beginning of the term, that would be very helpful.

Textbook(s)Required:

The Story Handbook: Language and Storytelling for Land Conservationists By Helen Whybrow (ed.) ISBN-13: 978-0967280622 $12.42 Privilege, Power, and Difference By Allan G. Johnson ISBN-13: 978-0072874891 $45.12

ENVS-007-02 Environmental Histories

Hour: 10A Instructor: Christopher Sneddon

Requirements Met: WCult: NW; Distrib: INT or SOC

Description:

Environmental Histories: Ecological, Cultural, and Political Change

As present-day environmental problems and conflicts over resources become more and more complex, the need to understand the political, cultural, economic and technological circumstances under which problems have emerged and evolved over time—in short, their history—becomes increasingly important. This course focuses on the work of environmental historians writing within a variety of historical and geographical contexts, from environmental changes in eighteenth century New England to the millennia-long ecological histories of Africa, Latin America and Asia. We will grapple with questions of why environmental history matters, and how environmental historians go about their trade. We will critically examine major works by William Cronon, Marc Reisner and other authors. You will also select a book (or film) of your own choice to read and critically review. Readings, discussions and assignments (both written and multimodal) will work towards three complementary goals: how to assess the material transformations of nature over time; how to interpret changing ideas of what nature is within different cultural contexts; and how to insert an historical perspective into current debates over sustainability and the politics of the environment.

Textbook(s)Required:

Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West By William Cronon ISBN-13: 978-0393308730 $15.80 The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River By Richard White ISBN-13: 978-0809015832 $12.13

Film Studies

FILM-007-01 Writing for Television

Hour: 3A Instructor: William Phillips

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Writing for Television

Students will learn how to write for TV using professional standards. We will use the show Breaking Bad, considered by many to be the best-produced show in history, as a case study, in order to explore writing, acting, directing, graphics, music composing, cinematography, editing, and other arts/crafts that contribute to a successful show, as well as the architecture of the script: teasers, act breaks, etc.

Students will write two traditional term papers on subjects of their choosing. They will also write one segment of a dramatic teleplay, using the Breaking Bad template provided by Final Draft screenwriting software made available by Dartmouth. Each student will give an oral presentation (to be augmented by multi-media… e.g. Power Point) on a subject of their choosing related to the production of Breaking Bad (a writer, cameraman, actor, aspect of the show, etc.).

Textbook(s)Required:

The Screenwriter's Bible by David Trottier Book The Hollywood Pitching Bible, vy Douglas J. Eboch and Ken Aguado - Book-Thais is available through the books website for a 40% diacount for Dartmouth Students. Talk to the Professor. Essentials of Screenwriting, by Richard Walter - Book

Geography

GEOG-007-01 Spatial Inequality

Hour: 2 Instructor: Lee Hachadoorian

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Spatial Inequality in the American City

The national conversation has turned to issues of inequality. Manhattan's Gini Coefficient of almost 0.6 puts it in league with some of the most unequal countries in the world. But implicit in such a statement about income distribution is not only a theory of justice, but ideas about where and at what scale resources should be distributed. We will look specifically at urban inequality, focusing on the spatial structure of cities and the distribution of services. This will necessitate an attempt to understand why households reside where the do, and the history of suburbanization and gentrification. We will end with case studies of spatial inequalities, including state-level educational equity lawsuits (many successful), environmental justice issues such as waste facility siting, and other topics chosen by the students.

As with other FYS there will be a focus on writing, research, and in-depth engagement with the subject. Two classes each week will be spent discussing the course subject matter. After the first week of class, these content discussions will be led by student facilitators. One class meeting each week will be spent on writing exercises, writing critique (including peer review), research planning, and progress reports. The course will also focus on "tools for effectiveness." X-hours will be devoted to exploring productivity methods, lifehacking, and specific softwares to aid project planning generally and academic research specifically, including, for example, the use of reference managers, mind mapping, and alternatives to traditional word processing software. We will also discuss procrastination in the writing process and tips for getting thoughts on paper.

No required textbooks available

Government

GOVT-007-01 Media & Politics

Hour: 11 Instructor: Deborah Brooks

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SOC

Description:

The Media and Politics

The variety of media sources covering politics has expanded substantially in recent years: online-only news, satire-based news, social media forums such as blogs, and other types of “new media” now exist alongside more traditional media sources such as newspapers and television news hours. In this seminar, we will explore how the media influences the nature of politics and political knowledge in the United States. Some of the questions we will examine include: How does the rise of new media affect the public’s understanding of politics? Are market forces pushing media outlets away from objective, in-depth, fact-based political reporting? How prevalent is partisan bias in the news media? How do journalists and politicians vie for control of the news? How powerful can the media be in anointing (or destroying) candidates? We will spend about two-thirds of our classroom time discussing the media and about one-third of our time discussing writing and associated seminar skills. Students will write and revise two 5-6 page analytical papers during the term; additionally, a class-produced blog about the media and politics will give us the opportunity to contrast formal and informal genres of writing in a hands-on manner.

Textbook(s)Required:

Graber, Doris A. 2010. Media Power in Politics, 6th Edition. Washington D.C.: CQ Press. [ISBN-13: 978-1604266108]

History

HIST-007-01 The Cold War

Hour: 11 Instructor: Allen Koop

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: SOC

Description:

The Cold War

This course focuses on the causes of the Cold War, then probes a few Cold War crises, and concludes with various explanations for end of the Cold War. Students are expected to discuss the reading assigned for each class. There are 3 essays of 1500 words each based upon the assigned weekly reading. A final essay of 2000 words is based on the assigned reading and outside sources.

Textbook(s)Required:

J. Gaddis, THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY M. Walker, THE COLD WAR: A HISTORY R. McMahon & T. Paterson, THE ORIGINS OF THE COLD WAR (4th ed.). W. Lederer & Burdick, THE UGLY AMERICAN A. Fursenko & T. Naftali, ONE HELL OF A GAMBLE

HIST-007-02 Places of American Physics

Hour: 10 Instructor: Richard Kremer

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

The Places of American Physics

This is a seminar about scholarly thinking, writing, reading, researching and speaking, with its subject matter taken from the history of science. We will not only do all those verbs, but also will talk together about how we do them and will examine together the writing that we create while doing them.

A single question will focus our work. Can we identify a "style" of American physics that differs from, say, styles of physics in Great Britain, Russia or Germany? Does place matter in science? To explore this question, we will investigate nine places selected by the American Physical Society as "Historic Sites," i.e., US institutions where in the judgment of this professional organization nationally or internationally significant physics happened. In 2012, the APS named Dartmouth to this list. Our seminar will thus explore local, national and international stories as we search for styles of scientific practice. And we will dig into the physics conducted in these nine places, exploring, among others, the concepts and experiments of electromagnetic induction, spectroscopy, interferometry, the wave behavior of elementary particles, and lasers and the coherence of light.

Textbook(s)Required:

Cassidy, David. A SHORT HISTORY OF PHYSICS IN THE AMERICAN CENTURY (Harvard University Press, 2013), ISBN #978-0-674-72582-9.

HIST-007-03 Colonies in 17th c. America

Hour: 10A Instructor: Paul Musselwhite

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Founding Colonies in Seventeenth-Century America

Throughout the seventeenth century, English colonial planners dreamed up diverse and conflicting structures, rules, and constitutions for new settlements in America. This course will introduce students to the skills of researching and writing as historians of politics and political thought through a detailed study of many of these key foundational documents, law codes, and charters. It will explore the early modern political and cultural debates that gave rise to such a varied patchwork of constitutional forms in early America and investigate how important they actually were to the lives of colonists.

The many famous documents that will be studied in-depth include: the military law code for the early years of the Virginia colony, John Locke's Fundamental Constitution of Carolina, and William Penn's Frame of Government for Pennsylvania. Writing assignments will include a detailed analysis of a specific primary source, an independent research paper, and also the chance to draft your own colonial constitution.

Textbook(s)Required:

Mancall, Peter (ed.), ENVISIONING AMERICA: ENGLISH PLANS FOR THE COLONIZATION OF NORTH AMERICA, 1580-1640 (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 1995). Rampolla, Mary Lynn, A POCKET GUIDE TO WRITING IN HISTORY, 6th ed. (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2009).

Italian

ITAL-007-01 Women in Renaissance Venice

Hour: 2A Instructor: Courtney Quaintance

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Women Writers in Renaissance Venice

This course will begin with a look at what life was like for women in Renaissance Italy. How were women expected to act? How was women’s behavior regulated by Renaissance society? How were women educated? How did society react to women who wrote? After we’ve established some basic context, we’ll move on to read letters, treatises, and dialogues written by three of the most important women writers in the Italian city of Venice: Moderata Fonte (a wife and mother), Veronica Franco (a courtesan, or high-class prostitute), and Arcangela Tarabotti (a nun). As we read, we’ll listen to what these women had to say about their own lives, and consider such topics as sex, love, education, politics, motherhood, and marriage. Course activities include discussion, which students will prepare and lead, film screenings, a field trip to the Hood museum, and research and writing workshops. Students will hone research, writing, and critical thinking skills through informal, short (2-3 pages) papers on class texts and themes, as well as a longer (8-10 pages) final paper focusing on a writer and topic of their choice.

Textbook(s)Required:

1. Title: The Honest Courtesan Author: Margaret F Rosenthal ISBN: 0226728129 Price: $23.51 2. Title: The Worth of Women Author: Moderata Fonte ISBN: 0226256820 Price: $23.39 3. Title: Poems and Selected LEtters Author: Veronica Franco ISBN: 0226259870 Price: $20.22 4. Title: Paternal Tyranny Author: Arcangela Tarabotti ISBN: 0226789667 Price: $25.96

Linguistics

LING-007-01 Dialects

Hour: 2A Instructor: Thomas Ernst

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Dialects

"Dialects" explores these varieties of a language in terms of their linguistic properties (grammar, pronunciation, vocabulary, etc.), and how they function in society—as markers of identity, as manifestations of pride or prejudice, or as manifestations of social change. At the same time, these issues will form the basis of discussions about good academic writing, including making clear and accurate descriptions, constructing a cogent argument, and constructing a well-structured essay with a logical flow that makes comprehension easy. Writing assignments include two short papers and a longer final paper.

Textbook(s)Required:

Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace, 4th edit. Williams & Colomb ISBN 0-205-83076-5 $25.00

Music

MUS-007-01 Through the Composer's Eye

Hour: 2 Instructor: William Summers

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Through the Composer's Eye: Reading Inside the Correspondence of Mozart, Beethoven, and Bernstein

The importance of letters written by composers of all generations is rarely discussed by the academic community. In the case of the three composers treated in this course we possess an incredible richness of information written in their own hands. Our ultimate goal in this course is to learn about correspondence as a central tool for gaining some knowledge and insights into the lives and works of three extraordinary musicians. These letters are the primary source material for research in this course.

Though these three men have almost mystical status as creative figures, they were also real people who lived in a particular setting in time. They found themselves imbedded in complex familial, interpersonal and professional situations throughout most of their careers. We will focus on four general regions of their lives: 1) their peak years of musical creativity, 2) the impact of family members and patrons upon their rise to fame, 3) their fiercest enemies and 4) the key moments in their lives as performers. Fortunately for us their thoughts on all of these matters are preserved.

Throughout this term we will learn about these individuals as people, using their correspondence, biographies and historical studies and our group discussions of their words to arrive at an understanding of them as unique creative individuals. To sharpen our thinking we will study correspondence as a form of literature, discuss their life circumstances comparatively in research papers, read selected letters aloud and present in dramatic form key biographical moments from their lives.

No required textbooks available

Native American Studies

NAS-007-01 Seeing Red

Hour: 10 Instructor: Angela Parker

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: ART

Description:

Seeing Red: Native Americans & Photography

The iconography of Native Americans has been shaped both by Euro-American tropes of the savage, and the human realities asserted by Native people themselves. The struggle over whether the photographic record would include only representations of the savage (dead savage, noble savage, the disappearing savage, Indian chief, Indian warrior, Indian shaman, Indian maiden), or would expand to include Native realities (resilience in the face of violence, bureaucratic control, family relationships, traditional culture, engagement with modernity, humor/irony, and esthetic sovereignty) has been fought throughout photography's 200-year history.

This First-Year Seminar introduces students to historical research and writing through the lens of photographic visual analysis and an abbreviated history of Native Americans and photography. Students will produce a research paper centered around explaining and contextualizing a single visual image they have chosen. As a foundation for submitting this paper, students will engage in photographic analysis, crafting a bibliography, outlining, and peer review of a rough draft.

No required textbooks available

Philosophy

PHIL-007-01 Contemporary Moral Issues

Hour: 12 Instructor: Ann Bumpus

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: TMV

Description:

Contemporary Moral Issues

Capital punishment, abortion and euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide will be the topics of this seminar. Our main focus will be on whether or not these practices are morally permissible. For example, is the state morally permitted to kill those convicted of serious crimes? Is a woman morally permitted to terminate an unwanted pregnancy? These topics raise issues about who has rights (fetuses? those who are comatose? convicted serial killers?) and about when it is permissible to kill. While our focus will be on whether these practices are moral, we will consider some related legal issues as well. Consequentialist, deontological, and other ethical theories will be discussed, as they are relevant. Course material will consist of contemporary philosophical articles, selections from classical philosophy, articles from the popular press, and films.

No required textbooks available

Physics

PHYS-007-01 Life in the Universe

Hour: 10A Instructor: Brian Chaboyer

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

Searching for Life in the Universe

Are we alone in the universe? This profound question has been asked for over two thousand years. Science is now attempting to answer this question. There are three distinct efforts underway searching for signs of extraterrestrial life: (1) an ambitious plan to explore our solar system, and in particular Mars for signs of life (past or present); (2) the development of new space telescopes which will look for earth-type planets orbiting other stars which harbor life, and (3) a search using radio telescopes to listen for signals originating from extraterrestrial sources. This course will examine the conditions, which are believed to be necessary for the development of life, the probability that extraterrestrial life exists, and will present an overview of our efforts to determine if we are alone in the universe.

Students are expected to be active participants in the class and will write three research essays.

Textbook(s)Required:

Title: Five Billion Years of Solitude: The Search for Life Among the Stars, (hardcover), 1st Edition Author: Lee Billings ISBN: 978-1617230066 Amazon: New - $20.93 / Used - $15.30

Psychological & Brain Sciences

PSYC-007-01 Brain Evolution

Hour: 2A Instructor: Richard Granger

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SCI

Description:

Brain Evolution

What is in a human brain, and how did it get there? How are brains built via genetic and developmental mechanisms? What makes one brain different from another, between species and within species? What makes populations different from each other? Who are our ancestors, and what was their evolutionary path to us? How did human brains get to their enormous size? How do brains differ from other organs? What mechanisms are at play over evolutionary time? The course will entail studying and writing about scientific findings in the field as well as controversies. There will be four writing assignments, each reporting on aspects of articles in the scientific literature.

Textbook(s)Required:

1. Principles of Brain Evolution, Striedter, Sinauer Press ISBN-10: 0878938206 ISBN-13: 978-0878938209 Approximate Cost: $76 (hardcover) 2. Big Brain, Lynch & Granger, Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN-10: 1403979790 ISBN-13: 978-1403979797 Approximate Cost: $12.32 (paperback)

Sociology

SOCY-007-01 Emotion and Culture

Hour: 10A Instructor: Kathryn Lively

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Emotion and American Culture

In this seminar we will study emotion from a sociological perspective—meaning how the culture and structures within a society shape both our experience and expression of emotion. Substantive topics include emotion norms, emotion management, and emotional socialization. We will also examine how emotions operate at work, in the family, and in social movement organizations. You will be asked to produce three writing assignments (two of which require multiple drafts), participate in two peer review processes, and present your final paper—which may or may not involve original data collection—to the class.

Textbook(s)Required:

none

SOCY-007-02 Race and Ethnicity

Hour: 11 Instructor: Emily Walton

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: SOC

Description:

Race and Ethnicity in the United States

In this course we start from the premise that racial and ethnic distinctions are a social construction. Students will explore how race matters by interpreting their own identity and experiences through the lens of a social scientist, examining interpersonal and institutional forms of racism and their consequences, and discover prospects for change in the future. Students are required to interpret class readings, perform short critical writing responses, evaluate others' work, facilitate and participate in class discussion, and write one 5-7 page essay, and one 8-10 page research paper.

Textbook(s)Required:

none

Theater

THEA-007-01 Theater for Social Change

Hour: 11 Instructor: Mara Sabinson

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Theater for Social Change

This course will trace particular developments in American and Western European Theater from the First World War through the present. Artists and theater groups under consideration will be those whose work has focused on contemporary social conditions and the potential of performance to effect social change. In addition, students will experiment with developing scripts and performances based on current events. Readings will include selections from the writings of Erwin Piscator, Bertolt Brecht, The Federal Theatre Project, Harold Pinter, Augusto Boal, etc. as well as newspapers, news magazines, and other media sources. In addition to creative and critical writing, students will be assigned one major research project. Emphasis will be on class participation.

Textbook(s)Required:

This course does not use a textbook.

THEA-007-02 Theater for Social Change

Hour: 2 Instructor: Mara Sabinson

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: ART

Description:

Theater for Social Change

This course will trace particular developments in American and Western European Theater from the First World War through the present. Artists and theater groups under consideration will be those whose work has focused on contemporary social conditions and the potential of performance to effect social change. In addition, students will experiment with developing scripts and performances based on current events. Readings will include selections from the writings of Erwin Piscator, Bertolt Brecht, The Federal Theatre Project, Harold Pinter, Augusto Boal, etc. as well as newspapers, news magazines, and other media sources. In addition to creative and critical writing, students will be assigned one major research project. Emphasis will be on class participation.

Textbook(s)Required:

This course does not use a textbook.

Women's and Gender Studies

WGST-007-01 Asian American Women's Lit

Hour: 10A Instructor: Woon-Ping Chin

Requirements Met: WCult: CI; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Asian American Women's Literature

In this course, we will study Asian American women's literary strategies and forms as expressions of their history, culture and gender roles. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which literature serves as a mode of resistance and a way of recuperating collective memory while asserting individual identity for Asian American women. Readings may include feminist treatises, creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry and drama and include such authors as Hisaye Yamamoto, Wang Ping, Chitra Divakaruni, Le Thi Diem Thuy and Diana Son.

Textbook(s)Required:

Required Textbooks (Subject to Change): Author: YAMAMOTO, HISAYE Title: SEVENTEEN SYLLABLES ISBN: 0-913175-14-5 Publisher: Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press List Price: $19.95 Author: WANG, PING Title: OF FLESH AND SPIRIT ISBN: 1-56689-3 Publisher: Coffee House Press List Price: $12.95 Author: DIVAKARUNI, CHITRA BANERJEE Title: BLACK CANDLE ISBN: 0-934971-74-9 Publisher: Calyx Books List Price: 12.95 Author: THUY, LE THIE DIEM Title: THE GANGSTER WE ARE ALL LOOKING FOR ISBN: 0-375-70002-1 Publisher: Anchor Books (Random House) List Price: $14.95 Author: HJORTSHOJ, KEITH Title: THE TRANSITION TO COLLEGE WRITING ISBN: 0-312-14916-6 Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin¿s List Price: $18.75 Author: RAIMES, ANN Title: THE OPEN HANDBOOK ISBN: 0-618-60715-3 Publisher: Houghton Mifflin List Price (2009): $46.95

WGST-007-02 Gender in Science Fiction

Hour: 10 Instructor: Douglas Moody

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: LIT

Description:

He, She, or It: Reconstructing Gender in Science Fiction

Speculative or "science" fiction has often been the domain of male writers, however, a number of feminist writers of speculative fiction have created alternative worlds and explored social issues in their fiction in order to challenge concepts of gender, genetics, sexuality, and the seeming intractability of patriarchal societies. In this class we will explore these worlds of resistance, which confront our current conceptions of gender as we boldly go where no person has gone before. Some of our primary readings include: Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, Donna Harraway, Marge Piercy, and Joanna Russ.

The students will read, view, discuss, critique, and conduct research on both fiction and non-fiction texts, as well as consider science fiction films and television programs. There will be three "analytical papers," which are based on the literature, critical essays, films, and television programs we will analyze, and at the end of the term the students will write one extensive (12 – 15 page) "final paper" that is research-based.

Textbook(s)Required:

Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. ISBN-13: 978-0385490818. $15.00 LeGuin, Ursula. The Left Hand of Darkness. ISBN-13: 978-0441007318. $16.00 Piercy, Marge. He, She, and It. ISBN-13: 978-0449220603. $7.99 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. ISBN-13: 978-0807062999. $16.00 A required course reader will also be available from Wheelock Books.

Writing Program

WRIT-007-01 Religion and Literature

Hour: 10A Instructor: Nancy Crumbine

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Religion and Literature: Revisioning the Invisible

Physicists write about God, clergy draw metaphors from nature, playwrights, poets and philosophers continue to weave, meld, clash, and intertwine the two, revisioning the invisible. In the search for meaning, nothing finally suffices but the company of those who seek to express the inexpressible. Readings include: Sophocles's Antigone along with Anouilh's retake, Dillard's Holy the Firm, Miller's The Crucible, and Morrison's Beloved; selected poems of Auden, Blake, Dickinson, Eliot, Kabir, Kenyon, Rilke, Roethke, and Rumi; and selections from the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures.

Textbook(s)Required:

Williams, Joseph. Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace, Longman, 4th ed. ISBN: 978-0205830763
Dillard, Annie. Holy the Firm, Harper Perennial, 1998 ISBN: 978-0060915438
Mitchell, Stephen, ed. The Enlightened Heart: An Anthology of Sacred Poetry, Harper Perennial, ISBN: 978-0060920531
Miller, Arthur. The Crucible (Penguin Plays), Penguin Books, 1976 ISBN: 978-0140481389

WRIT-007-02 Writers on Writing

Hour: 3A Instructor: Wendy Piper

Requirements Met: WCult: None; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Writers on Writing

Writers commonly talk about their own writing, discussing the goal and aims of their work, as well as the methods of their craft. In this class we will read, discuss, and write about the writing process of some major writers. We will look at their critical statements regarding the nature and purpose of their fiction and will study some of their short works in the light of those statements. Some of the questions we'll consider include the relation between writing and culture, the ethics of writing, and the stages of the writing process. Writers we'll read include O'Connor, Poe, and Faulkner.

Textbook(s)Required:

O’Connor, Flannery. Everything That Rises Must Converge, Farrar, Straus, 1965 ISBN: 9780374504649
Faulkner, William. Go Down, Moses, Vintage, 1970 ISBN: 0-679-73217-9
Poe, Edgar Allan. The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Writings, Penguin Classics, 1986 ISBN: 0-14-043291-4
Williams, Joseph & Colomb, Gregory. Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace, Longman, 4th edition ISBN: 978-0205830763

WRIT-007-03 Victorian Nightmares:Gothic

Hour: 12 Instructor: Colleen Lannon

Requirements Met: WCult: W; Distrib: LIT

Description:

Victorian Nightmares: Cultural Anxieties and the Gothic Form

Gothic stories evoke both fear and delight as they traverse the boundary between natural and supernatural realms. The transgressive nature of the Gothic can allow for the expression of beliefs, attitudes, and experiences that are culturally repressed or disallowed. At the same time, however, it can also be deeply conservative, policing society's boundaries by presenting moral transgressions in their darkest and most threatening form (incest, murder, betrayal, etc.). In this course, we will explore three different "types" of the English Gothic—female, Colonial, and fin de siècle—to examine the ways in which this form enables us to engage critically with the cultural anxieties of the time. Readings will include Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Castle of Wolfenbach, as well as short stories by Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Margaret Oliphant, among others. Through written assignments—two textual analyses, a summary and critique of a scholarly essay, and a research paper—students will work on developing their abilities in literary analysis and critical writing.

Textbook(s)Required:

Parsons, Eliza. Ed. Diane Long Hoeveler. The Castle of Wolfenbach: A German Story (Gothic Classics), Valancourt Books, 2006 ISBN: 0-9777841-6-9
Stoker, Bram. Eds. Nina Auerbach and David Skal. Dracula (Norton Critical Edition), Norton, 1996 ISBN: 978-0393970128
Stevenson, Robert Louis. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Signet Classics), Signet Classics, 2012 ISBN: 978-0451532251
Luckhurst, Roger, ed. Late Victorian Gothic Tales, Oxford Univ. Press, 2009 ISBN: 978-0199538874